Most of our projects begin with a clean sheet of paper and a lot of questions about brand promise, company mission and messaging, personality, goals and target audiences. This one was different. Having been in business for 10 years, Rosin Preservation had an established identity that they were proud of. And they didn’t want to confuse clients with a completely new design language because their core business wasn’t changing. They simply wanted a facelift, projecting a sophistication that would celebrate their decade milestone, honor their hard-won successes and feel of-a-piece with their new offices.

We began by deconstructing their existing logo. It had a distinctive '40s-era movie vibe (their first office was in Kansas City’s old Film Row block) that had graphic impact and was well-liked, but some of the letterforms were slightly inconsistent in line weight and spacing; the perspective lines that created the dimensional look didn’t all vanish to the same point; and that same perspective created a top-down point of view that felt a little awkward.

Take a look at the attached graphic for our design analysis and solution.


1. The dimensional shapes create letters of varying thickness and a point of view that looks down on the company name. 2. The incline upon which the name stands is too steep, creating an uncomfortable reverse rake and visual instability. 3. The “Preservation, LLC” text line feels incongruous with the hand-drawn “Rosin." Optically it is too heavy, and its placement nearly slides out of the circular form, creating visual tension and forcing the P to be clipped. 4. The lower arc does not precisely follow the curve of the upper arc, and truncates without apparent purpose. 5. Pulling the name out of the mark quickly reveals inconsistencies in spacing and line weight.

1. The dimensional shapes create letters of varying thickness and a point of view that looks down on the company name.

2. The incline upon which the name stands is too steep, creating an uncomfortable reverse rake and visual instability.

3. The “Preservation, LLC” text line feels incongruous with the hand-drawn “Rosin." Optically it is too heavy, and its placement nearly slides out of the circular form, creating visual tension and forcing the P to be clipped.

4. The lower arc does not precisely follow the curve of the upper arc, and truncates without apparent purpose.

5. Pulling the name out of the mark quickly reveals inconsistencies in spacing and line weight.

The redesigned logo addresses each of the trouble spots that we identified in the original. We hand-drew the Rosin name, making sure that the letterforms were uniform in appearance and optically consistent without feeling mechanical. Set on a gentler slope, we’ve given them a more heroic stance — we are now looking up to the company — and set ‘Preservation’ in a contemporary font that is graphically sympathetic and is set at the same angle. The circular forms are now complete. Offset and divided off-center, their proportions maintain a pleasing balance while creating an engaging interplay of positive and negative spaces. 

The redesigned logo addresses each of the trouble spots that we identified in the original.

We hand-drew the Rosin name, making sure that the letterforms were uniform in appearance and optically consistent without feeling mechanical. Set on a gentler slope, we’ve given them a more heroic stance — we are now looking up to the company — and set ‘Preservation’ in a contemporary font that is graphically sympathetic and is set at the same angle.

The circular forms are now complete. Offset and divided off-center, their proportions maintain a pleasing balance while creating an engaging interplay of positive and negative spaces. 


The new logo is crisp and contemporary. It honors the historical framework that is Rosin Preservation’s expertise while reflecting its 21st-century ethos. It offers a respectful, evolutionary (not revolutionary!) response to the client's needs. It nods to the past while positioning the firm for another decade of success, and establishes the groundwork upon which a unified graphic statement of print, digital and environmental platforms was built.

One final note: we always begin our design process in black and white because our objective at this point is to concentrate on form and legibility. Once we’re confident we have that nailed and receive client sign-off, we start exploring color palettes and supporting assets. We're writing about this next!

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